Tag Archives: NHS

4813-stressed-nurse

Nurses in Britain are Buried by Paperwork

Nurses in Britain are Buried by Paperwork

Nurses in Britain buried in paperwork planningforcare.co.ukNurses in Britain spend an estimated 2.5 million hours a week on “non-essential” paperwork that’s where Planning for Care can help

The Royal College of Nursing believes nurses are burdened with too much paperwork and too many targets.

I think every nurse would support that belief.

The view adopted by the inspectors and auditors appears to be ‘if it’s not written down, it’s not happening.’

In reality, there can be a well written Care Plan but the quality of care might bear no resemblance to what is set out within the Care Plan.

Nurses would much rather spend their time caring for patients or residents than completing paperwork such as care plans.

Unless nurses are producing excellent Care Plans, Care Home grades will suffer.

30 years ago written Care Plans did not exist, but the care delivered was, in the main, very good or excellent.

Perhaps this was because nurses did not have to spend much of their time producing the volume of paperwork that is necessary today.

I do very much believe in the benefit of care plans today.

It is the way forward and if written well, can really have the capacity to have a substantial effect and improve the quality of care.

Documentation is a crucial aspect of care, which facilitates the continuity of care and it forms an accurate record of care provided. It is now vitally important that the quality of resident’s care and nursing documentation is of the highest standard.

How Our Care Plans Can Help

A good system of Care Planning undoubtedly can help the nurses and carers complete the paperwork far quicker and more comprehensively.

A system of personalising care planning for the elderly, which Planning for Care provides, can vastly improve the delivery of care and help Care Homes improve the grading they are awarded by the Care Inspectorate by helping them meet their regulatory requirements.

“The challenges facing everyone in the care sector are growing exponentially with constant changes in law, increased regulation and the potential threat of litigation.”

The focus on nursing appears to have changed and, instead of it being a wonderful, satisfying and fulfilling occupation, it is now very much a race against time.

It is in everyone’s interest that the standards of care improve.

The National Health Service, and nurses in Britain are wonderful institutions which have to survive and flourish.

Progress is a great thing, but there needs to be a balance to ensure there is no deterioration in the very core standards and values of nursing. We need to rethink the path we are taking.

The days of placing massive importance on positioning each pillow case with the closed end facing the entrance door of the ward have gone!

But was it really such a pointless exercise?

In those days every nurse knew every detail about every patient, and every aspect of patient care was delivered with precision and thought.

Patient care may have been delivered in a task orientated way, but attention to detail was everything.

The pride nurses had in their job was tangible.

A mixture of the nursing cultures of yesteryear and today is, I think, needed to help elevate nursing to the high standard of profession it should be.

View our free sample Care Plan or our full range of Care Plans here. 

Old hands

“The NHS saved my life” – Stourport grandmother

A GRATEFUL Stourport couple have heaped praise on NHS staff who helped save her life after she was rushed int for emergency treatment.

Jennie Abbotts was taken ill after spending a day with her husband Rob and their grand-daughter Charley Belle on February 22 during the half-term break.

She suffered chronic stomach pains and vomiting and when her condition deteriorated, she was rushed to hospital where she underwent a laparotomy to sort out her twisted bowels – a repeat of a previous condition she had 20 years ago.

But she said the immediate response and dedicated care she received from the 111 NHS helpline, Primary Care at Kidderminster Hospital, paramedics from Dudley and finally Worcestershire Royal are what kept her alive.

She is now recovering at home and, in the week thousands took to London streets in a march to support the NHS, the couple – who have two children each from previous marriages and six grand-children – wanted to give their heartfelt thanks for the support they received.

Mrs Abbotts, a 67-year-old retired Wyre Forest District Council PA, said: “The consultant said had Rob not called for help and had they not operated as quickly then I wouldn’t be here today.

“All the staff were incredible. Firstly, the 111 helpline operator helped ensure I got seen at Kidderminster immediately before Dudley paramedics rushed me to Worcester.

“There is so much negativity about the Royal but I think they are all marvellous. The care was unbelievable. It was a frightening time for us but they were reassuring.

“They are under so much pressure but still did a magnificent, professional job. Of course, the NHS could do with more funding and they would deserve every penny.”

Retired butcher Mr Abbots, aged 66, added: “I just want to thank them all for everything they did. The nurses are modest and say it’s just what they do but they are incredible.”

A spokesman for Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust said: “We’re delighted to hear Mrs Abbotts had a positive experience at Worcestershire Royal Hospital.

“This case is a great example of NHS organisations working together to deliver efficient and effective care.

“As a Trust we are always pleased to receive positive feedback – which we will share with the staff involved in Mrs Abbotts’ care – and we wish her well in her recovery.”

Sourced by the The Shuttle online

Nurses in Britain spend an estimated 2.5 million hours a week on “non-essential” paperwork – Planning for Care Can Help

Britain’s nurses spend an estimated 2.5 million hours a week on ‘non-essential’ paperwork and clerical tasks, according to research.

The Royal College of Nursing believes nurses are burdened with too much paperwork and too many targets.

I think every nurse would support that belief.

The view adopted by the inspectors and auditors appears to be ‘if it’s not written down, it’s not happening.’

In reality, there can be a well written Care Plan but the quality of care might bear no resemblance to what is set out within the Care Plan.

Nurses would much rather spend their time caring for patients or residents than completing paperwork such as care plans.

Unless nurses are producing excellent Care Plans, Care Home grades will suffer.

30 years ago written Care Plans did not exist, but the care delivered was, in the main, excellent.

Perhaps this was because nurses did not have to spend much of their time producing the volume of paperwork that is necessary today.

I do very much believe in the benefit of care plans today.

It is the way forward and if written well, can really have the capacity to have a substantial effect and improve the quality of care.

Documentation is a crucial aspect of care, which facilitates the continuity of care and it forms an accurate record of care provided. It is now vitally important that the quality of resident’s care and nursing documentation is of the highest standard.

A good system of Care Planning undoubtedly can help the nurses and carers complete the paperwork far quicker and more comprehensively.

A system of personalising care planning for the elderly, which Planning for Care provides, can vastly improve the delivery of care and help Care Homes improve the grading they are awarded by the Care Inspectorate by helping them meet their regulatory requirements.

“The challenges facing everyone in the care sector are growing exponentially with constant changes in law, increased regulation and the potential threat of litigation.”

The focus on nursing appears to have changed and, instead of it being a wonderful, satisfying and fulfilling occupation, it is now very much a race against time.

It is in everyone’s interest that the standards of care improve.

The National Health Service is such a wonderful institution and it has to survive and flourish.

Progress is a great thing, but there needs to be a balance to ensure there is no deterioration in the very core standards and values of nursing. We need to rethink the path we are taking.

The days of placing massive importance on positioning each pillow case with the closed end facing the entrance door of the ward have gone!

But was it really such a pointless exercise?

In those days every nurse knew every detail about every patient, and every aspect of patient care was delivered with precision and thought.

Patient care may have been delivered in a task orientated way, but attention to detail was everything.

The pride nurses had in their job was tangible.

A mixture of the nursing cultures of yesteryear and today is, I think, needed to help elevate nursing to the high standard of profession it should be.

Elderly ‘reluctant to complain’ over health care

Elderly people are reluctant to make complaints about poor health care or do not know how to, the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman says.
A report suggested 56% of people aged over 65 who experienced a problem did not complain because of worries about how it might impact future treatment.
Nearly 20% did not know how to raise a complaint, it said, while a third felt complaining would make no difference.
Ombudsman Julie Mellor said it could mean some are “suffering in silence”.
That could “lead to missed opportunities to improve the service for others”, she added.
The research involved a national survey of almost 700 people over the age of 65, as well as focus groups and case studies.
‘Proactive approach’
One carer in Manchester told authors: “When people have a problem they don’t know where to go; they are referred to a computer which they don’t have; they are referred to a library which is too far away to get to… (and) they wouldn’t know what to do anyway.”
The report recommended a more proactive approach from NHS providers, saying they should make sure all users know how to complain and are reassured there will not be repercussions.
It said progress had been made, including through steps by the government to explore a new streamlined public ombudsman service to handle complaints.
But Age UK said the research was a cause for concern.
Charity director Caroline Abrahams said: “Seeking and responding to older people’s views and experiences is crucial if we are to prevent future care scandals like those that have too often blighted our hospitals and care homes in recent years.”
Healthwatch England said a universal, independent complaints advocacy service that was easy to find and simple to use would improve the situation.
A spokesman said: “We know the NHS is under pressure at this time of year, it is therefore vital that if things do go wrong patients are informed how to raise concerns and how to get help to do so if they need it.
“Without this support, thousands of incidents will continue to go under the radar every year and mistakes will never be learnt from.”
Source BBC News

NHS nursing levels: Nine in 10 hospitals missing targets

The vast majority of hospitals in England are struggling to recruit enough nurses, figures show.

Some 92% of the 225 acute hospital trusts in England did not manage to run wards with their planned number of nurses during the day in August.

The figures, published by the NHS, show that hospitals in England are falling short of their own targets for levels of safe staffing.

The Department of Health said staffing was a priority.

A spokesman added that 50,000 nurses were currently in training.

Analysis by the Health Service Journal shows average staffing levels across the 225 acute hospital sites in August was worse compared with data for January, when 85% of hospitals missed their staffing targets for nurses working during the day.

The figures also showed 81% of hospitals failed to have enough registered nurses working at night.

Some 79% of hospitals missed their target for registered nurse staffing across both day and night.

‘Long way to go’

Royal College of Nursing chief executive Janet Davies said hospitals were trying to catch up on their staffing levels.

She told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “We went through a period of time where we were trying to save money. We cut posts, we didn’t train enough nurses and we’re still feeling the effect of that.

“We’ve a long way to go. We’ve got to catch up on this for some time. But equally, we have to keep the nurses we’ve already got. It’s great to train people, it’s great to bring people in, but our experienced nurses are leaving.

“They’re leaving because they’re overtired – it’s a bit of a vicious circle.”

She said nurses were “exhausted” at the end of their shifts and often having to stay late to provide extra care.

“They do get very concerned because they know what they should be doing for patients and if they can’t, it’s really upsetting,” she added.

Hospitals have been required to publish monthly data on whether they have enough nurses on wards since April 2014.

It followed a report into the Mid Staffordshire NHS Trust, which was heavily criticised for failings of care that may have contributed to unnecessary deaths.

Many hospitals have had to boost their nurse numbers by recruiting overseas, and spending on agency staff has contributed to NHS deficits.

A Department of Health spokesman said: “Staffing is a priority – we’ve put more than 7,600 additional nurses on our wards since May 2010 and there are 50,000 nurses currently in training.

“We know that there are big challenges for hospitals, so we are helping the NHS to employ the staff it needs at a fair price by clamping down on rip-off staffing agencies and identifying billions of pounds of back-office savings so that as much money as possible goes to the front line.”

It comes after a study published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia suggested that fewer patients die after emergency surgery in hospitals that have more doctors and nurses.

The research, looking at data involving nearly 295,000 patients, also found death was more likely following a weekend admission, saying this showed staffing was a factor in the so-called weekend effect.

And a separate Nursing Times survey last week suggested nurses are under so much pressure that they cannot guarantee safe care for their patients.

The survey of nearly 1,000 nurses found eight out of 10 are under more stress at work than they were a year ago, with more than half saying they “rarely” or “never” had either sufficient time or staff to ensure safe care for patients. A third said their ward or team was “always” short-staffed.

Source BBC News

NHS rationing ‘is denying patients care’ as cash crisis deepens

Patients are being denied mental health care, new hips and knees, and drugs to boost their recovery from illnesses including cancer as the NHS increasingly rations treatments to try to overcome its growing cash crisis.

A survey of doctors reveals that three-quarters said they had seen care rationed in their area over the last year – including treatments such as speech therapy, operations to remove varicose veins, Botox to help children with cerebral palsy move better and even potentially life-saving stem cell transplant surgery.

Disabled children were having to use ill-fitting wheelchairs, teenage girls were banned from accessing medication to tackle male-style hair growth and women had been unable to access surgery to have breast enlargements or reductions as a result of growing restrictions across England, the research concluded.

Medical organisations said the findings showed patients were paying the price because an underfunded NHS was having to force them to wait for care or deny it altogether.

Dr Mark Porter, leader of the British Medical Association, said: “The NHS is being forced to choose between which patients to treat, with some facing delays in treatment and others being denied some treatments entirely. This survey lays bare the extreme pressure across the system and the distress caused to patients as a result.”

Almost four in five (78%) of the 749 doctors in England who took part in the survey – conducted for the Guardian by Binley’s OnMedica, a healthcare data and intelligence provider – said patients who were denied treatment suffered increased anxiety as a result.

One patient killed himself after experiencing a delay in receiving help with mental health problems.

Another doctor told how “several teenage girls with hirsutism [male-style hair growth on the face, chest or back] have experienced severe psychological distress and bullying [after being denied drugs to treat it]. Some have self-harmed and been admitted to hospital as a result”.

A 22-year-old woman with relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia died after being denied a second allogeneic stem cell transplant.

Her doctor said her late relapse and good response to salvage chemotherapy meant there was a 50% chance that a further transplant would have cured the disease.

However, the local GP-led clinical commissioning group refused to fund the procedure, which would have used healthy stem cells to try to help her bone marrow, and she received palliative care instead.

The findings prompted the health minister David Prior to warn that NHS bodies might be acting illegally by rationing.

“Treatment decisions should only be made by doctors based on a patient’s individual clinical needs,” he said. “Local health bodies have a legal responsibility to provide services meeting the needs of their local population, and we expect NHS England to act if there is any evidence of inappropriate rationing of care.”

Almost two-thirds (64%) of doctors said patients would be forced to go private.

A quarter (26%) said the rationing of procedures, such as hernia repairs, made it more likely that the person would end up being admitted to hospital as an emergency if their health worsened.

Prof Neena Modi, president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, said she was concerned that some of society’s most vulnerable children, including those with disabilities and mental health problems, were being affected by NHS rationing.

“The financial pressures on the NHS are subjecting vulnerable children to a postcode lottery,” she said.

Most (86%) of the 536 hospital doctors and 213 GPs who took part said rationing was occurring “for financial reasons” and 39% said it was “to help manage demand”.

Only 28% said it was because the evidence for the clinical evidence for certain treatments had changed and so they were no longer recommended.

The survey also found that:

  • Significant minorities of medics had seen restrictions on the removal of benign lumps and bumps (36%), breast reduction or enlargement (31%), varicose vein treatment (31%) and cosmetic surgery (28%).
  • Almost one in four (23%) had encountered drugs being rationed because they were too expensive. Cancer treatments were cited by 13% of doctors and “costly drugs” by 10%.
  • The same number (23%) had seen fertility treatment cut back.
  • Eighteen per cent had come across mental health care being withheld.
  • And 10% had seen hip and knee replacements cut back, despite the ageing population leading to growing numbers of older people needing such surgery.

One doctor in southern England told Binley’s how disabled children forced to wait for more than a year to receive injections of Botox, which is used to treat muscle conditions such as spasticity in children and adults, suffered increased pain or disability as a result.

The same doctor said that, due to rationing of wheelchairs, “children waiting for wheelchairs have pain and deformity from ill-fitting chairs, which are contributing to hip dislocation and worsening scoliosis”.

In addition, physiotherapists working with children using ill-fitting wheelchairs believed their role was “almost negated by the lack of postural control for these children”.

Modi said: “Of course this is concerning. No child or young person should receive a different level of care because of where they live. Some of the examples cited here involve some of the most vulnerable children – those with mental health problems and with long-term conditions. It’s crucial that these children get the right treatment, and where appropriate equipment, to manage their condition. If this isn’t the case, not only will their quality of life be compromised, but problems will be stored up for the future.”

Doctors are divided on rationing; 94.4% think it will inevitably increase as a result of the rising demand for care and NHS’s tight finances.

Three-quarters (74%) believe that the NHS is right to be rationing treatments either because that helps the NHS survive financially, or because not all treatments should be funded by the service or because free NHS services can be abused by patients.

However, one doctor said rationing was “a false economy. If people are not treated early, their problems become more costly to treat and they need to be treated for longer, leading to greater overall cost across the NHS in order to save a little in one part.”

Another said restricting care “is detrimental to the patient/doctor relationship if there is a feeling that treatments and tests are withheld on financial grounds only”.

Sarah Eglington, Binley’s healthcare intelligence director, said: “The fact that the majority of doctors surveyed are aware of restrictions on NHS services or treatments in England will shock many. But the harsh reality revealed by our research is that rationing is already occurring and it is likely to become increasingly common owing to rising demand for care and the NHS’s tight finances. Health professionals don’t want decisions purely to be made on cost.”

An NHS England spokeswoman said: “The basis on which people receive NHS care – within the funds parliament makes available – should always reflect their ability to benefit from treatment. The NHS strives to ensure we get maximum value from every penny available on behalf of patients.”

The findings come after a National Audit Office report found that one in four patients now struggles to get through to their GP surgery on the telephone, and dissatisfaction with family doctor services is rising. In 2014-15, 27% of patients said it was not easy to speak to their practice by phone, up from 19% in 2011-12.

Three-quarters of patients get an appointment within the timeframe they wanted but, overall, satisfaction is slowly declining, the NAO found.

The percentage of patients who get to see their preferred GP always, almost always or most of the time, has also fallen, from 66% in 2011-12 to 60% in 2014-15.

A fifth of patients also said opening hours were not convenient, up slightly on 2011-12.

Source The Guardian

Government accused of trying to ‘cover up’ scale of looming NHS winter crisis

Patients and health experts have accused the Government of trying to “cover up” the scale of a looming winter health crisis by blocking the publication of key waiting-time figures.

In a controversial move, made as MPs debated authorising bombing raids in Syria, the NHS announced it was dramatically scaling back the number of benchmark tests included in its weekly bulletins – now to be published monthly – which are supposed to give a snapshot of the state of the health service.

NHS England has confirmed that the updates, due to start on 11 December, will no longer include figures on A&E waiting times, ambulance delays outside hospitals or last-minute cancellation of operations. The number of patients left on trolleys for longer than four hours will also be taken off the updates.

The move comes after ministers admitted that the official reporting period for the winter had been shortened by a month – further limiting what the public can find out about growing problems in the NHS.

Over the past two years, “winter” ran from the start of November until the end of March. However, in response to a parliamentary question, Public Health minister Jane Ellison admitted that the reporting period this year will end a month earlier.

The move comes amid growing government fears that this winter crisis to set to be worse than at any time in the past five years because of staff shortages caused by a clampdown on expensive agency staff.

Speaking exclusively to The Independent on Sunday, Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour leader, accused the Government of “launching an NHS news blackout” to keep the public in the dark, and demanded that the Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, reinstate the weekly updates.

He added: “We’ve a crisis in A&E, hospital wards understaffed and people waiting longer and longer –  and the Tory response is to try and stop people finding out. These deeply cynical attempts to hide the truth reveal one thing: the Tories are failing patients.”

Last winter, the Government suffered a series of headlines about delayed operations, A&E waiting times and ambulance delays – all based on the weekly figures.

Shadow Health Secretary Heidi Alexander said there was “no justification for keeping patients in the dark about how their local health services are performing”. She has written to Mr Hunt to demand the weekly figures be reinstated.

One Tory MP admitted the changes were likely to have been introduced to avoid damaging headlines. The MP said the NHS was beginning to miss waiting times “on a routine basis”, and added: “I suspect there’s a degree of wanting to weaken scrutiny from a political perspective … A&E will struggle to hit its targets.”

Labour has been joined by health experts and patients’ groups in voicing their fury at the move.

Katherine Murphy, of the Patients Association, said the public had “a right to know” if hospitals were in danger.  “There are now many operations being cancelled on a daily basis with no date given for when the operation will take place.

This is leaving patients in pain and discomfort and increasing the chances of [their] condition getting worse. The Government needs to address this serious patient safety issue and this information needs to be in the public domain.”

Ms Murphy’s remarks were echoed by health pressure groups.

Nigel Edwards, chief executive of the Nuffield Trust, said: “It’s important  … for areas of the system where excessive pressure is being felt to become clear quickly. I am worried that only publishing figures monthly on indicators like waits in A&E and cancelled operations won’t provide this clarity quickly enough.”

John Appleby, chief economist at the King’s Fund, said that the change “appears to undermine the Government’s message about increasing transparency and making better use of data, and will reduce understanding across the health system about the impact of winter pressures”.

An NHS England spokesperson defended the move, saying: “We will be publishing on a monthly basis a full and comprehensive set of data on NHS performance for the public throughout the year, including this winter.

“This will include the normal measures such as the four-hour waiting standard and delays in transferring patients. The advantage is that doing this gives people a complete picture while also smoothing out week-to-week fluctuations which can be misleading.”

Source The Independent

Army poised to cover for striking NHS doctors

Army medical staff are expected to be drafted into NHS hospitals as cover for striking junior doctors, according to a document uncovered by The Telegraph.

The first of three strikes by junior doctors is due to begin on Tuesday Dec 1, when only emergency care is planned, with full stoppages on Dec 8 and Dec 16.

It would be the first full walkouts by doctors in NHS history.

In official guidance on industrial action issued by the British Medical Association (BMA), it said it expects medics from the Armed Forces will be used to help plug the gap on strike days.

The BMA advises striking doctors manning picket lines to be friendly to Army doctors – not least because as military employees, they have no right to strike.

In the Guide to Safe Picketing, published by the BMA, the professional trade union states: “It is likely that our Armed Forces colleagues will be asked to step in to provide support for clinical services on the days of action.

“The law does not permit them to take part in industrial action, but their support for services during the industrial action is welcome.”

A BMA spokesman said: “We don’t expect there will be a huge number of Army turning up at hospitals, but we are expecting a number of Army medics.”

The spokesman added: “We want to keep the NHS going. We have said from the very, very beginning we didn’t want to get to the stage of strike action. But junior doctors feel they have no other way of getting their voices heard.”

Army Medics parade through the City of London during the Lord Mayor’s ShowArmy Medics parade through the City of London during the Lord Mayor’s Show  Photo: PA

In the first strike, on Tuesday, doctors would offer emergency care only for 24 hours, while the following two strikes would mean a full walkout from 8am to 5pm.

It is expected that Army medical staff will cover Accident and Emergency services.

Department of Health officials remain locked in negotiations with unions.

Source The Telegraph

Discrimination against nurses ‘more common than most other NHS staff’

NHS managers have been issued a “call to action” to tackle discrimination, as new analysis reveals nurses are among the most likely professional groups in the health service to receive this kind of treatment.
Research by the King’s Fund think-tank on behalf of NHS England found 14% of nurses experienced discrimination in 2014, following a review of the most recent annual NHS staff survey.
The only other groups with higher levels of discrimination were healthcare assistants – reported by 17% of workers – and ambulance staff, where almost a quarter said they had been treated in this way.
The ethnic background of employees was the most significant factor for discrimination among all groups of workers – which included managers, doctors and allied health professionals – apart from ambulance staff.
Almost 9% of nurses said they had been discriminated against by patients, relatives or the public, while just over 8% said managers, team leaders or colleagues had acted in this way.
 
Overall, across the 255,000 staff members from 284 organisations that responded to the staff survey, 12% had experienced some form of discrimination.
Reported levels of discrimination were highest for black employees and lowest for white employees, while discrimination on the basis of faith was highest among Muslims.
The report called for more to be done to ensure the core values of the health service – including respect, dignity, compassion and inclusion – were “embod[ied] in all relationships, not only those with patients, service users and carers, but also in relationships between staff and between professional groups”.
Launching the report last week at a managers’ conference in London, NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens said: “This new report paints an important picture of what is happening. It represents a call to action for everyone in the NHS.”
He said the new Workforce Race Equality Standard – introduced in April and which requires NHS trusts to report their treatment of black and minority ethnic staff compared with white workers – would drive improvements.
Recent research has found BME staff are significantly under-represented in senior management positions within the NHS and at trust board level.
A report published last year by Middlesex University research fellow Roger Kline – called The Snowy White Peaks of the NHS – found that in 2012, 1% of NHS chief executives were BME and 16% of the NHS workforce overall.
Source Nursing Times

Safe nurse staffing bill moves closer to becoming law in Wales

A safe nurse staffing bill in Wales has moved one step closer to becoming legislation, after ministers took a vote on its financial implications.
Welsh assembly members passed the motion on the financial resolution for the Safe Nurse Staffing Levels (Wales) Bill last night.
It will now move onto the next part of the legislative process, which will see ministers consider amendments to the bill.
A further two stages will still need to be passed before the bill can become law.
Leader of the Welsh Liberal Democrats Kirsty Williams, who put forward the bill at the end of 2013, said last night’s decision was a signal ministers would agree for the law to be introduced.
“Nurses in Wales have to care for more patients per head than any other part of the UK. We simply can’t allow this situation to continue”
Kirsty Williams
She said the bill was a “golden opportunity” to combat negative media headlines about the Welsh NHS.
“The premise of this bill is simple – making sure there are more nurses on our hospital wards means each nurse will have more time to care for each patients.
“This will lead to better care outcomes for those patients, and a more manageable workload which might stem the flow of nurses leaving the profession,” she said.
“Nurses in Wales have to care for more patients per head than any other part of the UK. We simply can’t allow this situation to continue,” added Ms Williams.
A recent poll by the Royal College of Nursing in Wales of the general public found 90% said it was important to bring in the law.
If passed, it would see Wales become the first country in the UK with a legal duty on safe nurse staffing levels.
Source The Nursing Times