Tag Archives: Nursing Care Plans

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Nurses in Britain are Buried by Paperwork

Nurses in Britain are Buried by Paperwork

Nurses in Britain buried in paperwork planningforcare.co.ukNurses in Britain spend an estimated 2.5 million hours a week on “non-essential” paperwork that’s where Planning for Care can help

The Royal College of Nursing believes nurses are burdened with too much paperwork and too many targets.

I think every nurse would support that belief.

The view adopted by the inspectors and auditors appears to be ‘if it’s not written down, it’s not happening.’

In reality, there can be a well written Care Plan but the quality of care might bear no resemblance to what is set out within the Care Plan.

Nurses would much rather spend their time caring for patients or residents than completing paperwork such as care plans.

Unless nurses are producing excellent Care Plans, Care Home grades will suffer.

30 years ago written Care Plans did not exist, but the care delivered was, in the main, very good or excellent.

Perhaps this was because nurses did not have to spend much of their time producing the volume of paperwork that is necessary today.

I do very much believe in the benefit of care plans today.

It is the way forward and if written well, can really have the capacity to have a substantial effect and improve the quality of care.

Documentation is a crucial aspect of care, which facilitates the continuity of care and it forms an accurate record of care provided. It is now vitally important that the quality of resident’s care and nursing documentation is of the highest standard.

How Our Care Plans Can Help

A good system of Care Planning undoubtedly can help the nurses and carers complete the paperwork far quicker and more comprehensively.

A system of personalising care planning for the elderly, which Planning for Care provides, can vastly improve the delivery of care and help Care Homes improve the grading they are awarded by the Care Inspectorate by helping them meet their regulatory requirements.

“The challenges facing everyone in the care sector are growing exponentially with constant changes in law, increased regulation and the potential threat of litigation.”

The focus on nursing appears to have changed and, instead of it being a wonderful, satisfying and fulfilling occupation, it is now very much a race against time.

It is in everyone’s interest that the standards of care improve.

The National Health Service, and nurses in Britain are wonderful institutions which have to survive and flourish.

Progress is a great thing, but there needs to be a balance to ensure there is no deterioration in the very core standards and values of nursing. We need to rethink the path we are taking.

The days of placing massive importance on positioning each pillow case with the closed end facing the entrance door of the ward have gone!

But was it really such a pointless exercise?

In those days every nurse knew every detail about every patient, and every aspect of patient care was delivered with precision and thought.

Patient care may have been delivered in a task orientated way, but attention to detail was everything.

The pride nurses had in their job was tangible.

A mixture of the nursing cultures of yesteryear and today is, I think, needed to help elevate nursing to the high standard of profession it should be.

View our free sample Care Plan or our full range of Care Plans here. 

Nurses in Britain spend an estimated 2.5 million hours a week on “non-essential” paperwork – Planning for Care Can Help

Britain’s nurses spend an estimated 2.5 million hours a week on ‘non-essential’ paperwork and clerical tasks, according to research.

The Royal College of Nursing believes nurses are burdened with too much paperwork and too many targets.

I think every nurse would support that belief.

The view adopted by the inspectors and auditors appears to be ‘if it’s not written down, it’s not happening.’

In reality, there can be a well written Care Plan but the quality of care might bear no resemblance to what is set out within the Care Plan.

Nurses would much rather spend their time caring for patients or residents than completing paperwork such as care plans.

Unless nurses are producing excellent Care Plans, Care Home grades will suffer.

30 years ago written Care Plans did not exist, but the care delivered was, in the main, excellent.

Perhaps this was because nurses did not have to spend much of their time producing the volume of paperwork that is necessary today.

I do very much believe in the benefit of care plans today.

It is the way forward and if written well, can really have the capacity to have a substantial effect and improve the quality of care.

Documentation is a crucial aspect of care, which facilitates the continuity of care and it forms an accurate record of care provided. It is now vitally important that the quality of resident’s care and nursing documentation is of the highest standard.

A good system of Care Planning undoubtedly can help the nurses and carers complete the paperwork far quicker and more comprehensively.

A system of personalising care planning for the elderly, which Planning for Care provides, can vastly improve the delivery of care and help Care Homes improve the grading they are awarded by the Care Inspectorate by helping them meet their regulatory requirements.

“The challenges facing everyone in the care sector are growing exponentially with constant changes in law, increased regulation and the potential threat of litigation.”

The focus on nursing appears to have changed and, instead of it being a wonderful, satisfying and fulfilling occupation, it is now very much a race against time.

It is in everyone’s interest that the standards of care improve.

The National Health Service is such a wonderful institution and it has to survive and flourish.

Progress is a great thing, but there needs to be a balance to ensure there is no deterioration in the very core standards and values of nursing. We need to rethink the path we are taking.

The days of placing massive importance on positioning each pillow case with the closed end facing the entrance door of the ward have gone!

But was it really such a pointless exercise?

In those days every nurse knew every detail about every patient, and every aspect of patient care was delivered with precision and thought.

Patient care may have been delivered in a task orientated way, but attention to detail was everything.

The pride nurses had in their job was tangible.

A mixture of the nursing cultures of yesteryear and today is, I think, needed to help elevate nursing to the high standard of profession it should be.

Nurses to follow ‘moral compass’ on poor standards

As reported in the Nursing Times, Liz Redfern, a former deputy chief nursing officer who joined the NHS as a cadet nurse in 1970, was speaking after receiving an honorary doctorate from the University of Brighton.

    “Some of my proudest moments are when I have spoken up against poor practice whatever the consequences for me”

    Liz Redfern

“There will have been times already that have made you uncomfortable when you have seen practice that fell short of your own personal standards,” she told an audience of newly-graduating nurses.

“You know what you are witnessing is wrong – either technically or morally – and sometimes you will have spoken out and sometimes not,” she said.

People should not be nurses if they do not have a love of the job.

Nursing is a wonderful profession but it has changed drastically over the past 30 years and if the news headlines are anything to go by the changes are not for the better.

More and more cases of neglect and abuse.

Nursing used to be about patient care and supervision of care staff and the delivery of care.

Nursing is now very much a written paper trail of evidence and a disproportionate amount of time is spent ensuring paperwork is kept up to date.

The delivery of care and supervision of staff is now the lesser part of the job but is it not the most important?

Of course it is!

Excellent patient care is the goal for the CQC, NHS, UK government and it is very much the goal for nurses but with poor staffing levels and so much paperwork, how is it possible to do everything? 

An elderly person can have anything from 5 to 15 nursing care plans for a multitude of health and physical issues and numerous assessments to be completed.  

These care plans are basically in depth essays of each issue and how in agreement with the person the nurse or carer is going to deliver the care specific to that issue. Time consuming!

Click here to check out our Nursing Care Management Solution

Helping nurses and carers to write excellent detailed, person centred, Nursing Care Plans quickly and easily. 

Care Homes Needing Help with Documentation – Why Planning for Care?

My Care Home desperately needed help improving all the paperwork and documentation. 
It needed to be more detailed and individualised and every nurse and carer had to ensure the same standard of documentation.
I am first and foremost a nurse, and love being a nurse and I operate a Grade 6 Award winning Care Home in Scotland. 

I wanted to help my own and other Care Homes achieve excellence and meet the ever increasing demands of the Care Inspectorate.

I have had so many different people inspecting my Care Home and found that each of them had slightly different opinions and ideas about  what should be and comment on the content of our Care Plans and assessments, nobody could tell exactly what they were looking for and what would tick every box.

The increasing demands of the Care Inspectorate for the correct paper work means that trained nurses and carers are spending too much valuable time writing and re writing their care plans and assessments

I wanted to produce a system that would guide any nurse or carer no matter their abilities are to produce an extremely detailed person centred Nursing Care Plan.

This would enable anyone reading it to understand exactly what assistance the resident requires and what abilities and preferences they have.

In particular I wanted the nurses and carers to explore and get a real picture of who the resident is not just what issues they face.

I wanted the Care Plan to identify exactly what the resident could or would like to do themselves thereby encouraging and supporting them to maintain skills and remain as independent as possible.

I also wanted every Nursing Care Plan to be so precise and informative that any agency nurse or bank worker could deliver an excellent standard of individualised care.

Every elderly person deserves to have excellent care delivered in a dignified way.

The Nursing Care Plans produced by Planning for Care, focus on respect of choices, dignity and a person’s individuality.

They ensure that no matter what the resident’s difficulties or issues are, whether communication, mental health or otherwise, their voice is heard and their preferences and choices are respected.

The Planning for Care system and documents have dramatically improved my Care Home service.

The paperwork is much easier to complete, is far more detailed and takes less time to complete.

That means my nurses and carers can give much more time to the actual delivery of care, which is most definitely my priority.